Climate change is a global and complex issue that manifests itself differently from state to state through a variety of regional, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Given the global nature of this issue, governments and diplomats must have a say in this regard, find a convincing argument, create partnerships between states and global organizations to agree on regulations and ways to combat this problem. In order to reach a comprehensive understanding of the features of the problems faced by each area and to accelerate actions in this respect, it is necessary to involve several relevant actors in their societies, a dialogue between the regions to exchange visions and create more interest groups. Bilateral and multilateral partnerships can serve as significant tools for overcoming barriers.
An effective partnership should include governments – with foreign ministries assuming a core role – as well as representatives of science, business and civil society. Adelphi, Climate diplomacy- Reducing Risks for Security
Investing in low-carbon technologies is an opportunity for sustainable growth and economic growth. This requires international involvement, awareness and support for technology transfer. To mitigate the impact of climate change, the cooperation between countries is needed, and this involves strengthening the diplomatic network with focus on this issue.
Global climate change is a big risk for both developing and underdeveloped countries. Many fear that climate change will make it impossible for them to provide the necessary resources for the population.
Among the underdeveloped countries facing this problem is South Africa, which has declared that it is in a state of natural disaster, due to the drought in Cape Town, which threatens citizens with disruption of drinking water supplies.
Two of the most important threats that may compromise human security are drinking water (as we mentioned in the example of the current situation in Cape Town) and lack of food resources. Common foreign policies can support strengthening adaptation capacities and disaster preparedness.
Each continent, region and country are in different positions and the consequences of this change will be different and will have a social, political and economic impact. At the same time, their capabilities are different, Asia, Africa and the Middle East face different challenges.

Where is the link between Climate and Diplomacy?

Climate Diplomacy is a concept that involves geopolitical implications. When it comes to multilateral relations, in a global issue where only a few states are actively involved, diplomacy is the key that can unlock the dispute negotiation mechanism and initiate solutions.

Climate change is a global and complex issue that manifests differently from state to state through a variety of regional, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds.

Bilateral and multilateral partnerships can serve as significant tools for overcoming borders.

Countries should find solutions and combat climate disasters TOGETHER

Global climate change is a big risk for both developing and least developed countries. Many fear that climate change will make it impossible for them to provide the necessary resources for the population. Among the underdeveloped countries facing this problem is South Africa, which has declared that it is in a state of natural disaster, due to the earth drought in Cape Town, which threatens citizens with disruption of drinking water supplies.

Common foreign policies can support strengthening adaptation capacities and disaster preparedness. Adaptation to climate change and humanitarian aid is needed.

Each continent, region and country are in different positions and the consequences of this change will be different and will have a social, political and economic impact. At the same time, their capabilities are different, Asia, Africa and the Middle East face different challenges.

“Let us face it: There is no planet B.” said Macron in front of the US Congress

Macron in his visit to United States of America this year, urged Trump to keep the US in the Iran nuclear deal, predicted that America would rejoin the Paris Climate Accord and warned against the dangers of nationalism.

Will this Climate Agreement continue with or without United States? They cannot withdrawal until 2020.  Trump will last as president till the end of 2019.

Which is the purpose of this Agreement? Will this support also the businesses in this area? There are many questions.

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 25: French President Emmanuel Macron acknowledges applause at the conclusion of his address to a joint meeting of the U.S. Congress with Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) (R) and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol April 25, 2018 in Washington, DC. Macron is taking part in an official three-day visit to the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Climate change will become a “main pillar” of the relationship between the European Union and China, said the leaders.

Participation of Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the EC, Donald Tusk, President of the European Council at the EU-China Summit

The statement, signed by European Council president Donald Tusk, European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker and Chinese premier Li Keqiang, also included:

  • An agreement to release long-term strategies for their low carbon development by 2020
  • Agreement to step up their efforts before 2020;
  • “Triangular” cooperation with developing countries to increase their capacity to combat climate change and build clean energy;
  • A commitment to exchange knowledge on clean energy and explore the development of interconnecting networks;

Adelphi conducted an in-depth analysis jointly with players of German and international climate diplomacy

To address the knowledge gap at the nexus of urbanization, global governance and climate change politics, the German Foreign Office sponsored a workshop with leading thinkers and practitioners. Its recommendations and their implications were published in the report “Urbanization and Climate diplomacy”.

In cooperation with the German Federal Foreign Office,  Adelphi and its partners reached out to stakeholders, experts and organisations through-out the world over the course of 2011. Hundreds of decision-makers and experts participated in the events and tens of thousands of citizens joined public events during the World Social Forum in Porto Alegre, the Indian Water Forum in New Delhi, and the Durban climate negotiations. The objectives at
the core of these activities were to share standpoints, jointly identify priorities and develop common strategies.
KEY MESSAGES
› The security implications of climate change are already and increasingly challenging the international community.
› Efforts to stop climate change have been deficient. The international community needs to address unavoidable future repercussions of climate change impacts in the security sphere.
› Sea level rise: Rising seas endanger cities and infrastructure in coastal regions, where an increasing portion of the world population is located.
› Food security: The possible destabilising effects of food shortages are already endangering peace and stability in various parts of the world.
› Migration: Climate change may lead to an increase in population movements, which are likely to result in tensions in destination areas.
KEY RECOMMENDATIONS
› Take steps now for urgent action that complements and goes beyond international climate negotiations. It is important to improve the dialogue on climate change and security, build early warning capacities and promote partnerships for early action and conflict prevention.
› Evaluate the need for a geopolitical change management that takes into account the effects of changing physical environments on governance structures.
› Develop guidelines for conflict-sensitive adaptation practices, initiatives to reflect the interests of groups most affected by climate change.
› Build capacities to spend climate funds coherently and transparently with a special view to the governance challenges of fragile countries and regions.

Climate change is among the key challenges facing the international community. The impacts of climate change on peace and security are already tangible and will become increasingly evident in the yearsto come.” PETER WITTIG, Permanent Representative of Germany to the United Nations, July 2011

A new climate for peace- G7 take action

The Group of 7 has been at the forefront of putting climate-fragility risks on the global agenda.

The aim of the report A new Climate for Peace was examine the links between climate change and fragility, and what role foreign policy can should  play in order to address these challenges.

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